The Prism

Here’s another thought about what we can learn from the Jewish Festivals, which just happens to be the topic of my current message series. If you were there last Sunday, or if you get my newsletter, this will not sound so new to you. But nevertheless, it is original.

Many Christians dismiss the Jewish festivals as quaint at best, and legalistic, antiquated and irrelevant at worst. But they do not appear in the Bible on your shelf for no reason. When God ordained them, it’s as if he shined a bright white beam forward in time, to be understood at the moment only as something clear, simple and distinct. But was intended to eventually be seen as so much more than this, because he aimed it directly at the prismatic figure of Jesus, so that when the beam of light found him, it immediately refracted into every color. And when it hits your life, it refracts again, putting all your life circumstances in a new light. This is true not only of the Jewish festivals, but I believe of all Hebrew Scripture.

The fact is, the colors were all there from the start. But unless your eye is on Jesus, you only see the white light, if in fact you even see that much. And the more of the multiple colors refracting from His life you can perceive and process, the more illuminated your own life will become.

2 thoughts on “The Prism

  1. light is imperceptible, directly. like wind, only its evidence can be seen as it interacts with matter.as to your point (::wink::), from a Christian perspective, study of the OT, including the festivals, does have tremendous merit, in three primary ways:1) historical data,2) understanding the character of God and creation, and3) understanding the Christ event more fully (especially by way of contrast between Old and New Covenants).i think that, done with the proper perspective, celebrating redemption in Christ via these festivals could be incredibly enriching. more than that, it communicates that there has been and will always be one people of God, continuous from Old Covenant to New. when the world sees that Christianity did not arise in opposition to Judaism, but in fulfillment of its messianic anticipation, it will see a glorious story of the history of the world.

  2. light is imperceptible, directly. like wind, only its evidence can be seen as it interacts with matter.as to your point (::wink::), from a Christian perspective, study of the OT, including the festivals, does have tremendous merit, in three primary ways:1) historical data,2) understanding the character of God and creation, and3) understanding the Christ event more fully (especially by way of contrast between Old and New Covenants).i think that, done with the proper perspective, celebrating redemption in Christ via these festivals could be incredibly enriching. more than that, it communicates that there has been and will always be one people of God, continuous from Old Covenant to New. when the world sees that Christianity did not arise in opposition to Judaism, but in fulfillment of its messianic anticipation, it will see a glorious story of the history of the world.

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